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Legacy of the Mine

Ilan Godfrey has recently published his first book. Focused on the consequences of mining on the South African landscape and its people, I believe Ilan’s “Legacy of the Mine” is an important work for us in South Africa to reflect on the place and the true cost of the mining industry.

Swimming in the ‘Long Sea’, Diamanthoogte, Koffiefontein, Free State, 2013

Swimming in the ‘Long Sea’, Diamanthoogte, Koffiefontein, Free State, 2013

Ilan was the 2012 Ernest Cole Photographic Award winner and he used the award to complete the work which resulted in an exhibition and the book. Ilan was born in Johannesburg in 1980 and upon completing his schooling he studied in the UK at the University of Westminster in London where he completed a BA (Hons) degree in Photography and was awarded The David Faddy
Scholarship to continue his studies, gaining a MA degree in Photojournalism. In 2011 he returned to South Africa to continue to conceive and produce photographic projects on a full time basis. He has participated in the Focus on Monferrato Masterclass in Italy and was the recipient of the Ivan Kyncl Memorial Photography Placement.

The book can be purchased from Kalahari here.

 

Congratulations to Graeme Williams who is the winner of the 2013 Ernest Cole Award. His submission ‘in da city’ explores Johannesburg’s inner city. The announcement on the Ernest Cole Award site says:

The study explores Johannesburg’s inner city which has served as a first stop for many new arrivals since its formation as a mining town many years ago, yet is a city that has always been vibrant and is in a constant state of flux. Graeme portrays ‘da city’ in a dreamlike, tourist way as if one were a tourist that is approaching a foreign place with the associated disorientation that comes with this. The body of work is an attempt to avoid a critical observational photojournalistic approach and to rather approach the subject with a softer outsider’s gaze. Williams has a long history of looking critically at issues in South Africa and the continent. He has published and exhibited widely in South Africa and abroad.

Graeme managed South Photographs for a number of years in the 2000′s where I has a lot of interaction with him as we built South’s first online archive. He then turned to focus on his own photographic work. I look forward to seeing the output from this grant.

View Graeme’s website

You might also want to view Eva-Lotta Jansson’s fascinating interview with Graeme about his work on Photography and Democracy.

Youth and police in Tokoza, 1991. PHOTO: Graeme Williams / South Photographs / Africa Media Online

Youth and police in Tokoza, 1991. PHOTO: Graeme Williams / South Photographs / Africa Media Online

 

I have just returned from the beautiful city of Hangzhou in China’s eastern Zhejiang province where I had the privilege of being one of 13 judges at the 9th China International Press Photo Contest.

The Winner of the 9th CHIPP Awards. A Palestinian man kisses the hand of a dead relative in the morgue of Shifa Hospital in Gaza City, Nov. 18, 2012. © Bernat Armangue/AP

The Winner of the 9th CHIPP Awards. A Palestinian man kisses the hand of a dead relative in the morgue of Shifa Hospital in Gaza City, Nov. 18, 2012. © Bernat Armangue/AP

And what a contest it was! Over 30,000 images from over 3,000 professional photojournalists around the world were entered in to the competition. A preselection was made by Chinese judges and we had 3-and-a-half days to go through over 7,000 images and come up with the winners in 8 categories. Needless to say we worked from early morning to late at night each day coming up with gold, silver, bronze and excellence awards in each category. From all the gold medalists – both the singles and stories – the final day saw us selecting the overall winner of the competition. That honour went to Spanish photographer Bernat Armangue who works for the Associated Press (AP). His was a powerful image of a moment of heartbreak and tenderness in the midst of the brutality of war in Gaza.

The experience of being involved in the judging panel was rich in every way. For me there were a number of points that emerged.

The first was the excellent hospitality of the China Photojournalists Society. It was a culturally rich experience with so many things so different to home – the food, the language, the writing, the transport systems. As fellow judge, Maria Mann, Director of International Relations and Creative Photography at European Pressphoto Agency, said, never in her over 40 years of involvement in the photo industry has she experienced such honour and respect. I would certainly echo that. Never have I experienced so much press attention either.

Chinese press photographers take images of the judging panel at the 9th China International Press Photo Contest. PHOTO: David Larsen/Africa Media Online

Chinese press photographers take images of the judging panel at the 9th China International Press Photo Contest. PHOTO: David Larsen/Africa Media Online

The second was  the privilege of working alongside colleagues from all over the World – China, Argentina, Germany, United Kingdom, Hong Kong, United States, Thailand and India. Spending three and a half days selecting and at times in intense discussion (sometimes disagreement) with such esteemed colleagues proved to be a more significant learning experience than I had anticipated. This was hardly surprising with the likes of Maria Mann, Ruth Eichhorn Director of Photography for Geo Magazine Germany and Ricardo Mazalán photo editor at the Associated Press in Bogotá, Columbia. In spite of the language barrier there as healthy and positive working relationship between Chinese and international judges. This was particularly thanks to the excellent translation done by the competition secretary Huang Wen.

Judging the 9th China International Press Photo (CHIPP) Awards. A panel of 13 judges spend long hours over three-and-a-half days judging the awards. PHOTO: David Larsen/Africa Media Online

Judging the 9th China International Press Photo (CHIPP) Awards. A panel of 13 judges spend long hours over three-and-a-half days judging the awards. PHOTO: David Larsen/Africa Media Online

Thirdly the experience opened my eyes to China. There were so many fascinating stories from all over China and our Chinese colleagues were often able to give in-depth background to the stories that were presented. It was a tour of the issues facing the World’s most populous nation given by five of the most prominent photo editors in the nation. I certainly came away with a far greater appreciation and understanding of China. With so much more influence of China in Africa these days it was an honour to gain this perspective.

Young Workers From The Rural Areas. This is an image from a portrait picture story that won Gold in the People in the News and Portrait (Stories) in CHIPP 2012. Wu Jian, born in 1990, is from Anhui Anqing. He dropped out of junior high school and works in a garment factory in Hangzhou as a iron worker. He has a monthly income of 3,000 yuan. According to the statistics, about 200 million peasant workers in China have moved into cities from the countryside. Of these about 40 million were born after the 1990s. The lives of this generation of workers has not been improved in comparison with their Fathers. PHOTO: Li Zhenyu/Zhejiang Daily, China

Young Workers From The Rural Areas. This is an image from a portrait picture story that won Gold in the People in the News and Portrait (Stories) in CHIPP 2012.
Wu Jian, born in 1990, is from Anhui Anqing. He dropped out of junior high school and works in a garment factory in Hangzhou as a iron worker. He has a monthly income of 3,000 yuan. According to the statistics, about 200 million peasant workers in China have moved into cities from the countryside. Of these about 40 million were born after the 1990s. The lives of this generation of workers has not been improved in comparison with their Fathers. PHOTO: Li Zhenyu/Zhejiang Daily, China

Fourthly the competition itself has great significance. It has significance in encouraging quality photojournalism in China. We have certainly seen that over the last number of years with Chinese photographers claiming more and more awards in World Press Photo. It also has significance in honouring photojournalists all over the world who risk their lives day in and day out to document life and death in all corners of the globe. CHIPP does this by presenting the stories these photographers tell to the World’s most populous country – a massive audience for their work. I was just thinking about the impact that could be made on the illegal trade in rhino horn if a story on this won top honours at CHIPP!

An Ultra Orthodox Wedding. This story was awarded a silver medal in the category of  Daily Life (Stories). Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Nechama Paarel Horowitz fulfills the Mitzvah tantz during her traditional Jewish wedding to Chananya Yom Tov Lipa, the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Wiznitz Hasidic followers, in the Israeli town of Petah Tikva near Tel Aviv, Israel, Early Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012. The Mitzvah tantz, has family members and honored rabbis invited to dance in front of the bride, often holding a gartel, and then dancing with the groom. PHOTO: Oded Balilty/Associated Press

An Ultra Orthodox Wedding. This story was awarded a silver medal in the category of
Daily Life (Stories). CHIPP Awards draws entries from all over the World.
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Nechama Paarel Horowitz fulfills the Mitzvah tantz during her traditional Jewish wedding to Chananya Yom Tov Lipa, the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Wiznitz Hasidic followers, in the Israeli town of Petah Tikva near Tel Aviv, Israel, Early Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012. The Mitzvah tantz, has family members and honored rabbis invited to dance in front of the bride, often holding a gartel, and then dancing with the groom. PHOTO: Oded Balilty/Associated Press

Fifthly, being involved in judging the competition opened my eyes to the fact that this is a genuinely international competition with prize money to match. A lot of the winning entries came from the international wire services such the Associated Press, European Pressphoto Agency, Reuters and AFP. I saw very little work by African photographers and there are no African photographers among the winners. I myself was not aware the competition was open to professional photojournalists all over the world. I should imagine that was the situation for most of my fellow African photographers. I trust in the future African representation will grow significantly. The categories I would encourage African photographers to aim for in particular are the “Arts, Culture & Entertainment News” and “Nature & Environment News” categories as the number of entries in these categories is smaller than in other categories and as Africans we can certainly perform in these categories.

This image won Gold in the Nature & Environment News, Singles. A puppy stands by remains of a dog local residents said was its mother, days after it was killed in an area burnt in violence at East Pikesake ward in Kyaukphyu, Myanmar. Picture taken November 6, 2012.  PHOTO: Minzayar/ Reuters

This image won Gold in the Nature & Environment News, Singles.
A puppy stands by remains of a dog local residents said was its mother, days after it was killed in an area burnt in violence at East Pikesake ward in Kyaukphyu, Myanmar. Picture taken November 6, 2012. PHOTO: Minzayar/ Reuters

Private Troupe Dilemma  This picture won the sivler medal in the category of Art, Culture and Entertainment News  (Singles)  Actors of Shaanxi Suide Youth Jin Opera Troupe make up before a performance in Suide county of northwest China's Shaanxi province, August 23, 2012. The Suide Youth Jin Opera Troupe is a private local company, with nearly 40 employees. It has nearly 600 performances every year and its income barely covers its basic expenses. PHOTO: Jin Liangkuai/ Xinhua News Agency

Private Troupe Dilemma
This picture won the sivler medal in the category of Art, Culture and Entertainment News (Singles)
Actors of Shaanxi Suide Youth Jin Opera Troupe make up before a performance in Suide county of northwest China’s Shaanxi province, August 23, 2012. The Suide Youth Jin Opera Troupe is a private local company, with nearly 40 employees. It has nearly 600 performances every year and its income barely covers its basic expenses. PHOTO: Jin Liangkuai/ Xinhua News Agency

 

HURRICANE SANDY - House Dragged into Marshland Bronze Medal, Nature and Environment News (Singles) 9th CHIPP Contest. A house rests after being dragged through marshland in Staten Island, after the New York borough was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy on November 28, 2012. PHOTO: Adrees Latif/ Reuters

HURRICANE SANDY – House Dragged into Marshland
Bronze Medal, Nature and Environment News (Singles) 9th CHIPP Contest.
A house rests after being dragged through marshland in Staten Island, after the New York borough was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy on November 28, 2012.
PHOTO: Adrees Latif/ Reuters

Finally being involved in judging – spending half a week giving long hours of dedicated attention to photojournalistic images from all over the world – brought home to me again the weight and importance of photojournalism for the World today. There is an immediacy of communication that great photojournalism carries with it – more immediate than any other media. It can be a powerful force for change. We often see ourselves and our own circumstance in the pictures and it can galvanize us to action and bring about sustained protest and working for change. Apart from the winning picture by Bernat Armangue one of the most powerful images in the competition for me was this one from Afghanistan by Qais Usyan from AFP. Perhaps it is because South Africa struggles with a culture of rape. The New Age newspaper reported the other day that there are estimated to be over 1 million rapes in our country every year. The fact that there is no father present and the mother and children are having to deal with the crisis alone in this picture is powerfully representative of our circumstance in South Africa. We need such images in our nation to galvanize us to change.

Tragically Qais Usyan, an Afghan himself will never know of his award. He died after a brief illness on February 9, 2013. He was only 25. It is wonderful to be a part of honouring his memory in this way.

Raped Girl  This picture won a Gold Medal, General News (Singles) in the 9th CHIPP Contest The family of a five-year-old Afghan girl who was allegedly raped by a 22-year-old man, looks on as she lies in a hospital bed in Kaldar district of Balk Province of Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, on November 12, 2012.  The alleged rapist who was a neighbour was later detained by police.  PHOTO: Qais Usyan / AFP

Raped Girl
This picture won a Gold Medal, General News (Singles) in the 9th CHIPP Contest
The family of a five-year-old Afghan girl who was allegedly raped by a 22-year-old man, looks on as she lies in a hospital bed in Kaldar district of Balk Province of Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan, on November 12, 2012.
The alleged rapist who was a neighbour was later detained by police.
PHOTO: Qais Usyan / AFP

If you can read German Ruth Eichhorn of Geo wrote this report.

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It is wonderful to be able to announce that the winner of the World Press Photo Multimedia Award 2012, Elles van Gelder, will be one of the mentors on the two-week multimedia journalism masterclass in April.

ELLESILVYWORK 004

The Introduction to Multimedia Story Telling: The fundamentals of multimedia journalism masterclass is being run at Michaelhouse in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands from April 2-13. Participants will be mentored in the production of short-form multimedia journalism. Each participant will be hands on producing multimedia stories over the two week period and by the end should be able to turn around quality multimedia pieces within two-to-three days feeding print, web, television and radio. The course will be led by Sharron Lovell and Elles van Gelder.

Sharron will be leading the masterclass over the two weeks. Sharron Lovell is multimedia journalist and educator based in Asia. Equipped with a camera and other gadgets she attempts to explore some of the less represented sides of the places she works. She works both individually and collaboratively, focusing on features rather than single images or spot news.

Sharron lectures on the MA International Multimedia Journalism at Beijing Foreign Studies University (in collaboration with the University of Bolton, UK) and has led photographic workshops and training for photographers and journalists in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Sierra Leone, as well as multimedia training for the Malaysian Press Institute and UNICEF Bangkok. Sharron is represented by two international photo agencies, Polaris Images (US) and Shoot the Earth (UK) and holds a BA (First Class Honours) degree in Photography, and an MA Degree in Photojournalism & Documentary Photography.

Her work has been published in National Geographic books, PBS, Newsweek, The Guardian, Global Post, Berlinske, Politiken, The Wall Street Journal, The Economist & The Economist’s Intelligent Life,  China File, The Irish Times, Forbes, The Independent, Grazia, Ms. Magazine, Adbusters, Le Monde and The Financial Times as well as UNICEF UK.

Multimedia Story Telling Masterclass

Elles van Gelder will be supporting Sharron in the second half of the masterclass. She is a Dutch multimedia journalist based in Johannesburg. She moved to South Africa in 2007 to work on projects and assignments in sub-Saharan Africa as a writer, radio journalist, and videographer. Elles works as a freelancer and mainly focuses on features and has a love for long-term projects. 
While using her journalism skills individually, she also believes in merging the different ways you can tell stories in combining video, stills and audio.

As a videographer she made the multimedia film Afrikaner Blood together with photographer Ilvy Njiokiktjien, for which they won the World Press Photo Multimedia Award 2012, a Picture of the Year International Award (POYI) in the category Issue Reporting Multimedia and the Lumix Multimedia Award 2012.

Elles’ work has been published in many international publications, including Time Magazine, The Telegraph Magazine (UK), Mail & Guardian (South Africa), Le Figaro (France), L’Espresso (Italy) and National Geographic (The Netherlands).

There are just 12 places for participants in the masterclass. While the cost of the course is not inconsequential, for working photographers the ability to earn out of every story up to three times what they currently earn, means the investment is made back within months. For photography and journalism lecturers and for news organisations in South Africa it also makes perfect sense as an institutional investment. Bookings for this masterclass close next week Friday March 22, 2013.

For more information…

Multimedia Storytelling Full Course Outline

Shutha Digital Campus (multimedia) 2013 Booking Form

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John Liebenberg’s photography of the apartheid “border wars” in Namibia and Angola is a profound documentation of a period of history. He often ignored the sensorship bans of the apartheid regime and revealed the wars for what they were. A senior photographer now, still plying his trade, John has needed a hip replacement operation for some time. Although he has  given years of dedicated service as a photographer, not unusually such an operation was financially out of reach. So John’s friends and colleagues have rallied around and Stephan Weltz & Co. auctioneers of decorative and fine arts are conducting an “auction of fine South African photography.”

Namibia  1980's. SADF convoy passes through. This picture was taken at a SADF display in Ombalantu. Taking pictures of  military convoys they remains an offense. PHOTO: John Liebenberg/South Photographs/Africa Media Online

Namibia 1980′s. SADF convoy passes through. This picture was taken at a SADF display in Ombalantu. Taking pictures of military convoys they remains an offense. PHOTO: John Liebenberg/South Photographs/Africa Media Online

 

More than 50 of South Africa’s finest photographers have contributed prints for the auction “representing one of the most diverse photographic portfolios ever assembled in South Africa, with themes from documentary and conflict to politics, portraiture and wildlife.” Photographers include Roger Ballen, Jodi Bieber, David Goldblatt, Alf Khumalo, Gideon Mendel, Cedric Nunn, Obie Oberholzer, Jo Ratcliffe, Sydney Sheshibedi, Joao Silva, Guy Tillim, Paul Weinberg, Graeme Williams and John Liebenberg himself.

The auction takes place at 13 Bierman Ave, Rosebank, Johannesburg March 18, 2013, 18h00 for 18h30. See a low resolution PDF the catalogue below:

SA Photography Auction – catalogue – low-res

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I met Adolphus Opara in Ghana when he was selected as an All Star participant in the Twenty Ten project. I got to know him even better when he came to South Africa during the 2010 FIFA World Cup as a member of what we called the Dream Team of journalists who created stories throughout the event. It was clear he had significant potential as a young photographer. Definitely someone to watch. And it has been great to see some of that talent beginning to make an impact.

Based in Lagos, Nigeria, Adolphus has been busy recently. Just last month he launched an innovative exhibition in the Makoko district of Lagos called The Silent Majority curating the work of photography students from workshops they ran in Makoko. Now Adolphus has launched his first solo exhibition. So if you are in Lagos any time from now until April 21, why not go and view it. Details are below. If it is obstructed click on the invitation to see it clearly.

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I have recently had some interaction with Johannesburg based Swedish photographer, Eva-Lotta Jansson who is undertaking a valuable project to capture the history of how important photography was for South Africa’s transition to democracy.

PhotographyAndDemocracy.com is the output from the project that is only part way through. Eva-Lotta has begun to interview leading photographers in South Africa including David Goldblatt, Jodi Bieber and Cedric Nunn. The videos are published on the web site which is a free resource for photography training in South Africa.

David Goldblatt is interviewed by Eva-Lotta Jansson. PHOTO: Eva-Lotta Jansson

David Goldblatt is interviewed by Eva-Lotta Jansson. PHOTO: Eva-Lotta Jansson

Eva-Lotta says she created the interviews with South African photo students in mind. “The interviews are a little longer than one would normally see on the TV news or information-age web publications,” she said, “I wanted to try to capture and share the experience of listening to a mentor.”

“A photographer myself and sometimes a guest lecturer in photojournalism here in South Africa, I often wished I had more materials with which to prepare my lectures – especially when it comes to events here in South Africa. I like showing examples throughout history during which photographic documentation of events played a big role in protecting human rights and upholding democratic values.”

“There are few places where photography played as big of a role in shaping a democracy as it did here in South Africa. Photographers risked their lives to show the outside world what life was like under Apartheid, and to document the struggle against it.”

“Although a wealth of books and films has already been produced, these resources are not always accessible to everyone. So I thought this website might be useful to other tutors, students and photo enthusiasts in general. Fortunately many of the photographers I ask for an interview agree to participate. And luckily, the Open Society Foundation of South Africa thought it was a good idea too, and decided to sponsor the project.”

“Over time, I hope the PhotographyAndDemocracy.com series of video interviews will provoke interesting discussions about photography and South Africa’s democracy – in its current state, and for the future.”

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The first edition of DocuFest Africa gets underway in the beautiful setting of Michaelhouse in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands on the weekend of April 6-7, 2013. The festival will run parallel to the Encounters documentary film festival in the same venue.

Mostly using the format of projected screenings with questions and answers, the festival is focused on documentary photography and the curation of archives – the interface between capturing significant stories in the present and preserving and retelling those stories in the future. That for me is an exciting interaction. The festival comes in the midst of The Digital Campus which bring together professional media (photographers, picture editors, picture researchers, designers etc.) with heritage professionals (archivists, curators, collections managers, librarians etc.), an exciting interface of two communities that have much to give to one another.

The World Press Photo of the Year 1977: Leslie Hammond (South Africa), The Argus; Police throw tear-gas at a group of chanting residents of the Modderdam squatter camp protesting against the demolition of their homes outside Cape Town

The World Press Photo of the Year 1977: Leslie Hammond (South Africa), The Argus; Police throw tear-gas at a group of chanting residents of the Modderdam squatter camp protesting against the demolition of their homes outside Cape Town

The line up this year reflects the mix of new and old. Michiel Munneke, Managing Director of World Press Photo will head the line up looking at Africa and Africans in World Press Photo from when the competition started in 1955 to the present. Veteran musician and sound man David Marks starts the Sunday line-up at 8:30 am with From Woodstock to Splashy (via Witbank and Welkom) a look at the “hidden years” of South African music. Paul Weinberg follows exploring his family history and archives in Dear Edward – family footprints, the subject of his new book, asking important questions about who writes history and who is left out. Mozambican photographer Rui Assubuji looks back at the legacy of Ricardo Rangel and his profound influence on photography in Mozambique in Documenting the Documenters: Ricardo Rangel and Mozambican Photography in which he introduces and shows the documentary film by Bruno Z’Graggen and Angelo Sansone “No Flash: Homage to Ricardo Rangel, photographer (Mozambique, 1924–2009).”

Eric Miller’s Amatsha Ntliziyo: The Never-Give-Ups looks at the present crisis that grandmothers face in South Africa in looking after orphaned children as a result of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. After lunch veteran KZN photographer who is making significant waves in the international art scene, Cedric Nunn, will present his important retrospective Call and Response that particularly looks and the impact of apartheid social engineering on ordinary citizens of South Africa, particularly in the rural areas. Cedric is followed by East Asia based multimedia journalist, Sharron Lovell who will look at the changing documentary practice for stills photographers in Documentary Convergence: From Stills to Video. Veteran Durban photographer, Peter McKenzie will round the festival off by looking at the future of documentary practice in Documentary Practice: A New Generation.

I am totally thrilled by the line-up of speakers that has emerged and the possibilities of conversations that can come out of the event, particularly between those tasked with capturing history and those tasked with preserving it. I look forward to seeing you there.

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In November last year when I was down at the Ina-Doxa conference on digital archiving of audio-visual material I was introduced to Lesedi Oluko Moche Festival Director of the Encounters South African International Documentary Festival. Encounters is Africa’s longest running documentary film festival that runs every year in Cape Town and Johannesburg.

Encounters Logo

At the time of our meeting I was putting together The Digital Campus and so made the suggestion that we should try and bring “the best of Encounters to KwaZulu-Natal. She was open to the idea. So one thing led to another and we are now thrilled to announce that the Encounters International Documentary Festival will be running at Michaelhouse in the picturesque KZN Midlands over the weekend of April 6 and 7.

The line up is fantastic. The award winning film from the Joburg Film Festival starts us off on Saturday evening April 6, Orania by German filmmaker Tobias Linder kicks the festival off at 7 pm on Saturday evening April 6. And then on the Sunday we have the award winning South African films from the last 5 years of Encounters 2008-2012:

Shamiela’s House: Robyn Rorke

FOKOFPOLISIEKAR “Forgive them for they know not what they do”: Bryan Little

The 16th Man: Clifford Bestall

Forerunners: Simon Wood

The African Cypher: Bryan Little

 The Encounters festival will also run parallel in the same venue to DocuFest Africa a documentary photo and archives festival that will be run for the first time. Both festivals are also sandwiched by The Digital Campus which is being run during the week on either side. So there will be lots to do in the KZN Midlands.
Picture from Bryan Little's award winning South African documentary film African Cypher that follows dancers as they prepare in townships and on the streets for the Red Bull Beat Battle

Picture from Bryan Little’s award winning South African documentary film African Cypher that follows dancers as they prepare in townships and on the streets for the Red Bull Beat Battle

 

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If you are in Lagos today Adolphus Opara and Olusola Otori are showcasing the work from a project they created in a part of Lagos called Makoko where people live in homes built over water. The innovative exhibition will be printed to Life Size and installed on the Houses on stilts. So the works can be viewed while riding on a boat following a particular route. Screening of the Documentary film by Joel Benson will begin at 5pm. Sounds fabulous! Sorry I can’t be there.

SM Makoko Exhibition

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